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DIY RingFlash / Feito em Casa (more photos on comments) by Chaval Brasil on Flickr.Via Flickr:
[Explored]
Featured in a www.diyphotography.net/readers-projects-the-cd-spindle-ri…, it’s a great site for learning, I really recommend!
If you like this and make an improved version, please let me know so I can get some new ideas!
Thanks Kidneri for the idea on using a CD spindle case for the ring, and many other people on Flickr who did a similar project and posted the instructions.
With this piece of cardboard, plastic, tape and glue, I can take 1:1 photos from 30cm of the subject at 1/200s, f/22, ISO 100 in complete darkness, pretty good!
It makes a wrap around light with a soft shadow, much better than any diffuser I’ve tried for macro. Take a look at the photos I’ve taken with this ringflash.
Well, it’s not perfect… there’s a light loss, so the flash may fire at high power and I will need to wait it to recharge, but not much. It’s also too small for portraits, only indicated for macro.
- - -
Se você gostar dessa gambiarra e fizer algo melhor, por favor me avise assim posso pegar algumas novas idéias!
Obrigado Kidneri pela idéia de usar um tubo de mídias de CD para o anel, e muitas outras pessoas no Flickr que fizeram um projeto semelhante e colocaram instruções.
Com papelão, plástico, fita e cola, eu consigo tirar fotos 1:1 à 30cm do alvo em 1/200s, f/22, ISO 100 em completa escuridão, muito bom!
Ele cria uma luz em volta do objeto com uma sombra suave, muito melhor que qualquer difusor que tentei para macro. Veja as fotos que tirei com esse ringflash.
Bom, não é perfeito… há uma perda de luz, então o flash pode disparar em alta potência e demorar um pouco para recarregar, mas não muito. Também é pequeno demais para retratos, só indicado para macro mesmo.

DIY RingFlash / Feito em Casa (more photos on comments) by Chaval Brasil on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
[Explored]

Featured in a www.diyphotography.net/readers-projects-the-cd-spindle-ri…, it’s a great site for learning, I really recommend!

If you like this and make an improved version, please let me know so I can get some new ideas!

Thanks Kidneri for the idea on using a CD spindle case for the ring, and many other people on Flickr who did a similar project and posted the instructions.

With this piece of cardboard, plastic, tape and glue, I can take 1:1 photos from 30cm of the subject at 1/200s, f/22, ISO 100 in complete darkness, pretty good!

It makes a wrap around light with a soft shadow, much better than any diffuser I’ve tried for macro. Take a look at the photos I’ve taken with this ringflash.

Well, it’s not perfect… there’s a light loss, so the flash may fire at high power and I will need to wait it to recharge, but not much. It’s also too small for portraits, only indicated for macro.

- - -

Se você gostar dessa gambiarra e fizer algo melhor, por favor me avise assim posso pegar algumas novas idéias!

Obrigado Kidneri pela idéia de usar um tubo de mídias de CD para o anel, e muitas outras pessoas no Flickr que fizeram um projeto semelhante e colocaram instruções.

Com papelão, plástico, fita e cola, eu consigo tirar fotos 1:1 à 30cm do alvo em 1/200s, f/22, ISO 100 em completa escuridão, muito bom!

Ele cria uma luz em volta do objeto com uma sombra suave, muito melhor que qualquer difusor que tentei para macro. Veja as fotos que tirei com esse ringflash.

Bom, não é perfeito… há uma perda de luz, então o flash pode disparar em alta potência e demorar um pouco para recarregar, mas não muito. Também é pequeno demais para retratos, só indicado para macro mesmo.

DIY Ring Flash by Arkku on Flickr.Via Flickr:
A ring flash is such a popular and easy DIY project that I finally couldn’t resist the temptation to make one myself. I’ll post some detailed instructions on how to make one (like this) when I have more time, but most of you should be able to figure out the essentials just by looking at the finished product.
Materials:
- plastic dome (originally intended for covering food in a microwave oven)
- a tin (sans fruit salad)
- something with male filter threads on it; I used a very cheap Cokin P filter holder clone
- aluminium baking foil
Total cost of materials (excluding paint and glue) was approx. €7 (and we ate the fruit salad from the tin; it’s included as a bonus). Of course, a regular flashgun is also required, and with this method of mounting the flash you need some way to trigger it off-camera (optical triggering by the built-in flash would work nicely since light from the trigger flash is blocked by the dome).
One thing to consider with this method of construction is that the lens cannot have rotating filter threads (when zooming or focusing), because they almost certainly would not welcome having to fight the weight of the ring flash, and the flashgun position would change during focusing (mine doesn’t fall even if it’s under the ring, but I wouldn’t count on it). The best lens for this is a prime with internal focusing (i.e. length doesn’t change depending on focus), but an extending macro lens worked fine in my experiments. For flimsier lenses it is probably better to mount the ring on the camera somehow (e.g. with some kind of holder attached to the tripod threads), or hand-hold the flashgun above the ring instead of supporting its weight on it.

DIY Ring Flash by Arkku on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A ring flash is such a popular and easy DIY project that I finally couldn’t resist the temptation to make one myself. I’ll post some detailed instructions on how to make one (like this) when I have more time, but most of you should be able to figure out the essentials just by looking at the finished product.

Materials:

- plastic dome (originally intended for covering food in a microwave oven)
- a tin (sans fruit salad)
- something with male filter threads on it; I used a very cheap Cokin P filter holder clone
- aluminium baking foil

Total cost of materials (excluding paint and glue) was approx. €7 (and we ate the fruit salad from the tin; it’s included as a bonus). Of course, a regular flashgun is also required, and with this method of mounting the flash you need some way to trigger it off-camera (optical triggering by the built-in flash would work nicely since light from the trigger flash is blocked by the dome).

One thing to consider with this method of construction is that the lens cannot have rotating filter threads (when zooming or focusing), because they almost certainly would not welcome having to fight the weight of the ring flash, and the flashgun position would change during focusing (mine doesn’t fall even if it’s under the ring, but I wouldn’t count on it). The best lens for this is a prime with internal focusing (i.e. length doesn’t change depending on focus), but an extending macro lens worked fine in my experiments. For flimsier lenses it is probably better to mount the ring on the camera somehow (e.g. with some kind of holder attached to the tripod threads), or hand-hold the flashgun above the ring instead of supporting its weight on it.

Reflective Umbrella DIY by heipei on Flickr.Via Flickr:
After having built my own lens hood and mini-softbox (before buying anything) I decided to put a broken umbrella to good use today. I simply taped plain printer paper to the inside, sawed off part of the handle and stuck it in the grip of my tripod.

Reflective Umbrella DIY by heipei on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
After having built my own lens hood and mini-softbox (before buying anything) I decided to put a broken umbrella to good use today. I simply taped plain printer paper to the inside, sawed off part of the handle and stuck it in the grip of my tripod.

DIY - Black Straw Grid Snoot by Tom Leuntjens Photography on Flickr.Via Flickr:
My version of the black straw grid snoot.
Materials used :
- some thick black paper or cardboard
- about 24 black straws  (1 straw gets you 3 x 4cm parts)
- super glue
- some tape (black would have been better but hey , these won’t win you a beauty contest)
How its done :
- measure the black cardboard so it wraps around your flash unit
- prefold the paper (don’t glue it yet)
- start cutting the straws
- glue the straws, putting glue on the paper works wonders, work row per row.
- wrap-it and put some tape around for extra strength
- shoot !
Based on the article found at Lighting Mods

DIY - Black Straw Grid Snoot by Tom Leuntjens Photography on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
My version of the black straw grid snoot.

Materials used :

- some thick black paper or cardboard
- about 24 black straws (1 straw gets you 3 x 4cm parts)
- super glue
- some tape (black would have been better but hey , these won’t win you a beauty contest)

How its done :

- measure the black cardboard so it wraps around your flash unit
- prefold the paper (don’t glue it yet)
- start cutting the straws
- glue the straws, putting glue on the paper works wonders, work row per row.
- wrap-it and put some tape around for extra strength
- shoot !

Based on the article found at Lighting Mods

DIY SC-28 Flash Cord clone by akeeh on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Visit my website at akikorhonen.org for more projects, thanks!
_____________________________________________
So I wanted a SC-28 cord for my camera and flash but didn’t want to pay that much for just two connectors and a cable so I decided to make it myself. Didn’t have anything important to do this weekend so here is the result. The flash shoe also has the locking hole for the flash so it stays very firmly in place.
First I started by cutting and shaping a piece of 1 mm thick aluminum to get a body for the flash shoe and after that I started building the connection part of it on a prototyping board (dot coppered). After all that was done I assembled them together and filled the hole thing with hot glue to give it some strength (I could have used epoxy for better strenght but didn’t have any at hand). The tripod mount is done from a 4 mm thick piece of aluminum and then drilled and threaded.
Camera side of the thing is done from various pieces of plastic superclued together. I got the springs and studs from a flash shoe adapter (one flash, many changeable mounts). I could have used that to make this but it was a bit too tricky to modify and I didn’t have one with a ready Nikon mount.
The connectors are PS/2 connectors (or mini-din, used in keyboards etc). I left the cables that short because I can use a normal PS/2 extension cable with this. Cost for this project was 0€ (all the material I used were found by looking around the apartment) so now I can use the saved money to something else useful (maybe a set of cheap wireless triggers). :)
Tools used: A drill press (a normal drill would have been suitable), a hacksaw, small knife, set of files, few pliers, two clamps (to press things together when applying glue), soldering iron.
Edit, 16-Dec-2007: I found my 3-meter PS/2 extension cord and it works perfectly with this. I also did some small modifications to the hot shoe by putting a small amount of solder to each of the pins to make them a bit higher and it now works much better because all the pins on the flash now get a better connection.
_____________________________________________
Featured in Strobist on December 10, 2007:
» Straddling the Line Between Genius and Insanity, Part Deux
_____________________________________________

DIY SC-28 Flash Cord clone by akeeh on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Visit my website at akikorhonen.org for more projects, thanks!
_____________________________________________

So I wanted a SC-28 cord for my camera and flash but didn’t want to pay that much for just two connectors and a cable so I decided to make it myself. Didn’t have anything important to do this weekend so here is the result. The flash shoe also has the locking hole for the flash so it stays very firmly in place.

First I started by cutting and shaping a piece of 1 mm thick aluminum to get a body for the flash shoe and after that I started building the connection part of it on a prototyping board (dot coppered). After all that was done I assembled them together and filled the hole thing with hot glue to give it some strength (I could have used epoxy for better strenght but didn’t have any at hand). The tripod mount is done from a 4 mm thick piece of aluminum and then drilled and threaded.

Camera side of the thing is done from various pieces of plastic superclued together. I got the springs and studs from a flash shoe adapter (one flash, many changeable mounts). I could have used that to make this but it was a bit too tricky to modify and I didn’t have one with a ready Nikon mount.

The connectors are PS/2 connectors (or mini-din, used in keyboards etc). I left the cables that short because I can use a normal PS/2 extension cable with this. Cost for this project was 0€ (all the material I used were found by looking around the apartment) so now I can use the saved money to something else useful (maybe a set of cheap wireless triggers). :)

Tools used: A drill press (a normal drill would have been suitable), a hacksaw, small knife, set of files, few pliers, two clamps (to press things together when applying glue), soldering iron.

Edit, 16-Dec-2007: I found my 3-meter PS/2 extension cord and it works perfectly with this. I also did some small modifications to the hot shoe by putting a small amount of solder to each of the pins to make them a bit higher and it now works much better because all the pins on the flash now get a better connection.
_____________________________________________

Featured in Strobist on December 10, 2007:
» Straddling the Line Between Genius and Insanity, Part Deux
_____________________________________________

£1.50 ($3) DIY Ring Flash! (Weight: 230 grams!!) by Alex [ www.bytefish.com ] on Flickr.Via Flickr:
OK, my ring flash is finished (apart from the cover) and it works! It cost £1.50 to make here in England, $3 to you guys in the states.
Made from:
1x Plastic frosted plate (20p)
1x Recycled Cardboard Hanging Basket liner (80p)
1x Black Graphite/Plastic Plant Pot(50p)
1x Sheet of Tin Foil
1x Bit of Cereal Box Card
1). I used a jigsaw to roughly cup the centre out of the plate, then used a circle cutter to drill the perfect circle out of my plant pot. 
2). I then cut the bottom out of the cardboard hanging basket liner with a stanley knive and some sandpaper to even to circle out.
3). I used silicone sealant to fix the plate around the lip of the plant pot, this fit nice and snug, you could use some superglue or similar adhesive, because once all the parts are together the plate is pressed up against the lip by pressure anyway, so this is just to make the design more rugged.
4). I then lined the basket and plant pot with tin foil, stuck down with PVA glue I found in the shed.
5). Once dry I pressed the plant pot/plate  into the card hanging basket and adjusted the size of the hanging basket hole into the hole thing fit together snug. I then glued the all in place with some extremely heavy duty glue called ‘Mitre Bond’ it is a glue and a fixing spray which hardens the glue in seconds. I used it to glue the black pot to the back of the card basket, and then once that was set (in about 3 seconds!) I sealed the frosted plate to the front of the card basket, all the way around.
6). after the glue had set I silicon sealed the front of the ringflash that I had just glued, in order to protect the inner edge and to tidy up on top of the glue.
7). While this dried I made an adapter the slot into the back of the ring flash and over the on board flash of my Nikon D200. I made this out of cereal box card, lined the inside with tin foil to reflect the light and wrapped it in black electrical tape. I cut a small letterbox shape into the back of the ring flash and secured the adapter in place with the crazy powerful ‘Mitre Bond’ glue. (Note: I added a flap of foil on the end of the adapter that went inside the flash so that it directed the flash light around the ring rather than straight out of the diffusing plate)
8). That’s it! The final weight of the ring flash i approximately 230 grams. In England thats the same weight as a £1.39 bar of Cadburys dairy milk!!
It’s extremely light and extremely well fitting, it hugs around you lenses Nikon mount, especially a Tamron 17-50mm as seen above. It wedges in so well that it doesn’t move at all and it’s so close to the camera’s centre that you can’t feel any weight from the ring flash at all. 
The final item is super solid and ridiculously light!
This works well at close range, fantastic for macro and close up work, and turns your on board flash into a usable light when coupled with your expensive SB’s rather than just being a wireless trigger as mine had previously become.
I hope you like it and maybe this design will help some of you create your own cheap ring flashes. All these parts were bought from ASDA in England, they sell these bits in ALL the ASDA’s across the country.
Hope you like it, please check out the final result here:

£1.50 ($3) DIY Ring Flash! (Weight: 230 grams!!) by Alex [ www.bytefish.com ] on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
OK, my ring flash is finished (apart from the cover) and it works! It cost £1.50 to make here in England, $3 to you guys in the states.

Made from:

1x Plastic frosted plate (20p)
1x Recycled Cardboard Hanging Basket liner (80p)
1x Black Graphite/Plastic Plant Pot(50p)
1x Sheet of Tin Foil
1x Bit of Cereal Box Card

1). I used a jigsaw to roughly cup the centre out of the plate, then used a circle cutter to drill the perfect circle out of my plant pot.

2). I then cut the bottom out of the cardboard hanging basket liner with a stanley knive and some sandpaper to even to circle out.

3). I used silicone sealant to fix the plate around the lip of the plant pot, this fit nice and snug, you could use some superglue or similar adhesive, because once all the parts are together the plate is pressed up against the lip by pressure anyway, so this is just to make the design more rugged.

4). I then lined the basket and plant pot with tin foil, stuck down with PVA glue I found in the shed.

5). Once dry I pressed the plant pot/plate into the card hanging basket and adjusted the size of the hanging basket hole into the hole thing fit together snug. I then glued the all in place with some extremely heavy duty glue called ‘Mitre Bond’ it is a glue and a fixing spray which hardens the glue in seconds. I used it to glue the black pot to the back of the card basket, and then once that was set (in about 3 seconds!) I sealed the frosted plate to the front of the card basket, all the way around.

6). after the glue had set I silicon sealed the front of the ringflash that I had just glued, in order to protect the inner edge and to tidy up on top of the glue.

7). While this dried I made an adapter the slot into the back of the ring flash and over the on board flash of my Nikon D200. I made this out of cereal box card, lined the inside with tin foil to reflect the light and wrapped it in black electrical tape. I cut a small letterbox shape into the back of the ring flash and secured the adapter in place with the crazy powerful ‘Mitre Bond’ glue. (Note: I added a flap of foil on the end of the adapter that went inside the flash so that it directed the flash light around the ring rather than straight out of the diffusing plate)

8). That’s it! The final weight of the ring flash i approximately 230 grams. In England thats the same weight as a £1.39 bar of Cadburys dairy milk!!

It’s extremely light and extremely well fitting, it hugs around you lenses Nikon mount, especially a Tamron 17-50mm as seen above. It wedges in so well that it doesn’t move at all and it’s so close to the camera’s centre that you can’t feel any weight from the ring flash at all.

The final item is super solid and ridiculously light!

This works well at close range, fantastic for macro and close up work, and turns your on board flash into a usable light when coupled with your expensive SB’s rather than just being a wireless trigger as mine had previously become.

I hope you like it and maybe this design will help some of you create your own cheap ring flashes. All these parts were bought from ASDA in England, they sell these bits in ALL the ASDA’s across the country.

Hope you like it, please check out the final result here:

Nes’ art mask by D’MYS  on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Me revoilà, peu présent mais pas bien loin ;)
Mettre un nom sur un visage… je vous présente Nes mon ami artiste peintre avec qui je collabore!
Décalé? Sombre? Morbide? Une vision résolument différente.

Nes’ art mask by D’MYS  on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Me revoilà, peu présent mais pas bien loin ;)

Mettre un nom sur un visage… je vous présente Nes mon ami artiste peintre avec qui je collabore!
Décalé? Sombre? Morbide? Une vision résolument différente.